The 5 Mental Models of Super Achievers

Learn these 5 models to turbocharge your success

You may not have heard of Marisa Peer, but you will have heard of her clients – Billionaires, Hollywood ‘A’ Listers, and Olympic greats. They have one thing in common – they are all super achievers. They are in the top 1% of the population. As the leading hypnotherapist and psychotherapist in the UK, she noticed that her clients had 5 key mental models or beliefs that they shared which allowed them to be remarkable. You can learn these 5 models and turbo charge your success.

5 Mental Models of Super Achievers

As entrepreneurs and business leaders we need to master the inner game to win the outer game of business. I had an opportunity to meet Marisa and her equally successful husband, John, at Afest in Croatia. Marisa was voted the top speaker at this event. I had an opportunity to have lunch with the both of them. Marisa shares 5 key beliefs her super achiever clients have that you too can adopt:

  1. Do what you hate to get where you want to be – Super achievers have understood the price of membership to be in the top 1% and they are willing to pay that price. It will mean sometimes doing things that you hate. It could be getting up and training early. It could be making 25 cold calls per day.
  2. Do what you hate first – Super achievers slay their dragons at the start of the day. They don’t postpone the things they hate to later in the day. They understand that there is power in taking head on the thing you hate. Having done the thing they hate they start the day with a sense of achievement that carries momentum to the remaining part of the day.
  3. Take action every day – Super achievers understand that momentum comes from taking daily deliberate actions, even if they are small steps. They do not even take a day off, not even Sundays! The habit of taking daily action allows them to continue to make progress and not be side tracked. Procrastination does not stand a chance with this mindset.
  4. Don’t let rejection slow you down or stop you – Super achievers know that to get what they want they will have to face rejection. I know when I was starting BNI India there were enough naysayers saying that this would not work in India. I used to say to them that with or without you I was going to do this. Don’t let other people’s opinions stop you from pursuing your dreams. It’s important that you have a clear compelling vision that inspires you despite what others may say.
  5. Have the natural ability to delay gratification – Super achievers reward themselves after they do what they hate. They know that they have to delay gratification after they have achieved certain milestones. Too often we reward effort in society, but the real world only rewards achievement. A simple way to do it is have “if then” rules. For example if you increase your sales by 25% in the next quarter then you will go to Goa to celebrate.

So which mental model do you resonate with? Which one would you like to adopt first to take your life to the next level?

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14 thoughts on “The 5 Mental Models of Super Achievers

  1. I got all ur points thy all are worth understanding….i do follow half of it still fail…..in my work…ny more guidance.

    • Hi Nishpa – it’s important to understand also what strategy you are using to to achieve your goals. Sometimes we may be using the wrong strategy and therefore things fail.

    • Enjoyed reading your post. Yes the journey of an entrepreneur is difficult at the start but these are the ‘take of’ boosters that help in the journey. Many thanks.

  2. Expecting Rejection, I avoid getting into action. Now onwards, I will work without bothering about the result.

    Secondly, I will start what I hate to do first.

    Thanks for valuable inputs for growth.

  3. Greetings !
    I hate things to do and I do it first what I hate is a challenge to mind set and I agree with that achiever should do it …to be a super achiever ..
    Reach your goal and celebrate .. yes .. I need to learn myself as well as my i should pass on to my team to learn and practice and perform .. which I am lacking partly .. guide please

    • Keyur – A couple of tips:
      1. I suggest that before you start doing the “thing you hate” visualise doing the thing and it going really well. See, hear and feel yourself enjoying it in advance. You will find it easier to do.
      2. Write down the first step you need to take for the “thing you hate” the night before and write down where and when you will take that first step. The research shows that this method has a 90% chance of getting done than just a normal to do list.

      Hope that helps.
      Neeraj

  4. This was really a good information, indeed an alert for “Not doing what you hate” have been using some of them in my daily calender, but will adopt some which I was not doing. I used to change my ideas many times when people used to tell it want work, even though I had a strong belief in it, but from now I will never give up the ideas which my inner sense will tell “IT WILL WORK”, Thanks a lot.

    Carving Manju.

  5. Dear Neeraj,
    Valuable insights indeed.
    I have a great habit of putting important but things i hate in the ‘pending tray.’ The mind refuses to tackle them. I know I need to attend to them. But it does not happen.
    Reading this I am inspired to work on it more rigorously. But ‘how?’ That will remain a question

  6. Hey NIRAJ

    This is fabulous. If applied these principles can take us next level, whether it’s business or life. Thanks for these pearls of wisdom.

    Rohit Raul

  7. Is it wise to say that these people simply “have the natural ability” to delay gratification? If one doesn’t already delay gratification, are you telling them they just don’t have the ability to succeed like this? It seems like a mistaken choice of words — correct me if I am wrong.